Best 21 what month do you plant collard greens

Below is the best information and knowledge about what month do you plant collard greens compiled and compiled by the lifefindall.com team, along with other related topics such as:: when to plant collard greens in georgia, when to plant collard greens in north carolina, growing collard greens in containers, collard greens growing stages, when to plant collard greens in louisiana, when to plant collard greens in florida, how to grow collard greens from the stem, collard greens seeds.

what month do you plant collard greens

Image for keyword: what month do you plant collard greens

The most popular articles about what month do you plant collard greens

Tips On How To Grow Collard Greens – Gardening Know How

  • Author: www.gardeningknowhow.com

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (24763 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 4 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 2 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Tips On How To Grow Collard Greens – Gardening Know How Collard greens are a cool season vegetable and are often planted in late summer to early autumn for winter harvest in the south.

  • Match the search results: Collards are frost tolerant, so growing collard greens in USDA growing zones 6 and below is an ideal late season crop. Frost actually improves the flavor of collard greens. Collard greens planting may also be done in early spring for a summer harvest, but adequate moisture is necessary for collards …

  • Quote from the source:

Collard Greens Zone Planting Guide | Miracle-Gro

  • Author: www.miraclegro.com

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (21060 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 4 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 2 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Collard Greens Zone Planting Guide | Miracle-Gro Xem thêm 15 hàng

  • Match the search results:  *

    Set out spring plants 3 to 4 weeks before the last frost; in late summer, plant 6 to 8 weeks before the first frost for fall and winter harvests. Direct sow when the soil can be worked in the spring. Use seedlings to replant in mid-summer for a fall harvest.

  • Quote from the source:

Plant collard greens now for harvest months to come – Austin …

  • Author: www.statesman.com

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (6091 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Plant collard greens now for harvest months to come – Austin … Collards can be planted throughout the fall and into spring, but allowing them to mature during the freezes of winter will improve the flavor of …

  • Match the search results: Collard greens are a staple in Southern U.S cuisine, best known for being cooked with pork. Though collards originated in the Mediterranean, the influence that they and other bitter greens have on Southern American cuisine is attributed to African American culture, arising from the need for enslaved…

  • Quote from the source:

When Is a Good Time to Plant Collard Greens? – Home Guides

  • Author: homeguides.sfgate.com

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (5535 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about When Is a Good Time to Plant Collard Greens? – Home Guides In the spring, time planting for two to three weeks before the last spring frost date to ensure that the plants receive the right amount of cold temperatures …

  • Match the search results: Collard greens (Brassica oleracea var. acephala) belong to the Brassicaceae, or cabbage, family. These cool-season vegetables grow in most U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones in the spring. In milder USDA zones 8 and higher, growing collard greenss in the spring and fall, producing …

  • Quote from the source:

Collard Greens | NC State Extension Publications

  • Author: content.ces.ncsu.edu

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (30243 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 4 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 2 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Collard Greens | NC State Extension Publications The collard is a cool-season crop that should be grown during early spring or fall. Direct seed midsummer or early spring. Set transplants out …

  • Match the search results: In a large saucepan, sauté onions in oil until golden brown. Add remaining ingredients except lemon. Simmer over low heat, covered, until greens are tender. Squeeze lemon over top of greens and okra mixture just before serving.

  • Quote from the source:

How to Grow and Care for Collard Greens in Your Garden

  • Author: www.masterclass.com

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (36621 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 4 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 2 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about How to Grow and Care for Collard Greens in Your Garden If you live in an area with hot summers and mild winters, plant your collard greens in the late winter or early spring for a spring crop, once …

  • Match the search results:
    Cloudflare Ray ID: 6f5a5d6fde73919f

    Your IP: 103.116.106.104

    Performance & security by Cloudflare

  • Quote from the source:

Growing Collard Greens: A Southern Staple – Epic Gardening

  • Author: www.epicgardening.com

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (2043 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Growing Collard Greens: A Southern Staple – Epic Gardening You can plant collard greens by seed or seedling either in early spring, or late summer. Grow collard greens when it’s …

  • Match the search results: If you’re growing tree collards, you can take a cutting to propagate them. Most varieties, however, only propagate by seed. This year, I decided to let my collard green plant grow beyond harvest time, and let it flower. Once the flowers died, seed pods grew and fattened. I snipped off the pods and p…

  • Quote from the source:

How to Grow Collard Greens in the Winter (Care Guide)

  • Author: gardenisms.com

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (39927 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 4 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 2 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about How to Grow Collard Greens in the Winter (Care Guide) Collards are a cold-loving plant and should be planted in spring, summer, or fall if you have a quick to harvest …

  • Match the search results: So, you want to grow collard greens in the winter.

  • Quote from the source:

All About Collards – Burpee

  • Author: www.burpee.com

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (12195 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about All About Collards – Burpee How to Grow Collard Greens … Collards prefer rich, well-drained soil in full sun. In spring, sow seed directly in the garden 1/4 to 1/2 inch …

  • Match the search results: Enjoy collard greens steamed, sautéed, or boiled. They can be used to flavor soups or stews, or cooked and served with ham and pork. See all of our collards for sale by clicking here.

  • Quote from the source:

How to Plant, Grow, and Care For Collards in Your Garden

  • Author: www.allaboutgardening.com

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (13938 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about How to Plant, Grow, and Care For Collards in Your Garden Directly seeded collards work best for fall and winter plantings, but you can also direct sow in the spring. It’s best to sow collards in the …

  • Match the search results: Collards are one of the earliest cultivated vegetables, dating back to prehistoric times. The ancient Greeks grew a diversity of both collards and kale, typically making no distinction between them. Collards even pre-date their better-known cabbage relatives because the wild cabbage varieties were a…

  • Quote from the source:

How to Grow Collard Greens | HappySprout

  • Author: www.happysprout.com

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (12022 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about How to Grow Collard Greens | HappySprout You can start planting collards two to three weeks before the last frost in spring, or in late summer to early fall, two to three months …

  • Match the search results: Collard greens require remarkably little care. The majority of care for collards is watering them. They use quite a bit of water when producing leaves, so they need even, consistent moisture. An inch to an inch and a half of water each week is ideal, but a layer of mulch or a drip irrigation system …

  • Quote from the source:

How Long To Grow Collard Greens – SeniorCare2Share

  • Author: www.seniorcare2share.com

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (32777 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 4 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 2 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about How Long To Grow Collard Greens – SeniorCare2Share How many collard green seeds are in a hole? Should you soak collard seeds before planting? When should I start …

  • Match the search results: Collard greens are a cool season vegetable and are often planted in late summer to early autumn for winter harvest in the south. Collard greens planting may also be done in early spring for a summer harvest, but adequate moisture is necessary for collards greens growing successfully in summer heat.

  • Quote from the source:

Quick Answer: What Month Do You Plant Collard Greens

  • Author: www.seniorcare2share.com

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (8022 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Quick Answer: What Month Do You Plant Collard Greens Are collards cold hardy? Do collard greens regrow? Can you plant collards in October? How far apart should I plant cabbage? * Set out …

  • Match the search results: Collard greens are a cool season vegetable and are often planted in late summer to early autumn for winter harvest in the south. Collards are frost tolerant, so growing collard greens in USDA growing zones 6 and below is an ideal late season crop. Frost actually improves the flavor of collard green…

  • Quote from the source:

How to Grow Collard Greens | Gardener’s Path

  • Author: gardenerspath.com

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (35453 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 4 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 2 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about How to Grow Collard Greens | Gardener’s Path Start seeds indoors four to six weeks before you plan to transplant outdoors. For a spring planting, you’ll want to transplant as soon as the …

  • Match the search results: Likely descendants of ancient wild cabbages in Asia, collards as we know them today originated in the eastern Mediterranean. Ancient Greeks, for example, cultivated several types of collard.

  • Quote from the source:

How to Grow Collard Greens | Southern Living

  • Author: www.southernliving.com

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (5636 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about How to Grow Collard Greens | Southern Living Within each row, set out transplants 18 to 24 inches apart. If you sow seeds, thin seedlings to that same distance. When space is an issue, collards also work …

  • Match the search results: Collard Green CareCollards like to be fed. Choose a fertilizer high in nitrogen (because you're promoting leaves, not flowers). Try Dynamite Organic All-Purpose (10-2-8). Water regularly. Deter collard-loving caterpillars, especially in spring, with a biological insecticide such as DiPel or Thu…

  • Quote from the source:

Growing Collards (Collard greens, Borekale) in USA – Zone 5a …

  • Author: www.gardenate.com

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (32938 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 4 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 2 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Growing Collards (Collard greens, Borekale) in USA – Zone 5a … I did not start my collard, cabbage, seed in March – can I plant the seeds in the garden now in mid-July? Also, can I plant cauliflower in the garden from seed …

  • Match the search results: (Best months for growing Collards in Australia – temperate regions)

  • Quote from the source:

Is it too late in the season to plant collards? – The Virginian-Pilot

  • Author: www.pilotonline.com

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (11970 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Is it too late in the season to plant collards? – The Virginian-Pilot While they could be sown directly into your planters in late winter/early spring, starting them indoors will give you a jump and should give you …

  • Match the search results: Given the hot and dry weather we’ve experienced lately, I suspect many folks may be struggling with their collards, and other fall crops as well. Several have asked, is it too late to start them? Depending on the particular variety, collards are 60 – 85 days to maturity. In Tidewater, depending on …

  • Quote from the source:

Collards – Vegetable Directory – Watch Your Garden Grow

  • Author: web.extension.illinois.edu

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (34509 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 4 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 2 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Collards – Vegetable Directory – Watch Your Garden Grow Champion (60 days to harvest; dark green; long-standing, compact plant; … spacing should be harvested by picking the larger leaves when the plants are 10 …

  • Match the search results: Collards, also known as collard greens, are a member of the cabbage family. Collard greens have always enjoyed grand popularity in the southern states and lately it’s popularity has grown throughout the nation. Collards grow from a main stalk with leaves that grow outward on inedible s…

  • Quote from the source:

Growing Collard Greens: How to Sow, Care for & Harvest

  • Author: www.johnnyseeds.com

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (11795 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Growing Collard Greens: How to Sow, Care for & Harvest DIRECT SEEDING: Plant from early spring to approximately 3 months before expected fall frost. For bunching, sow 3–4 seeds every 12-18″, ½” deep, in rows 18–36″ …

  • Match the search results: This site uses cookies to personalize your experience, measure site performance, and show you relevant offers and advertisements. To learn more about our use of cookies, as well as the categories of personal information we collect and your choices, please read our Privacy Policy. By clicking ALLOW o…

  • Quote from the source:

Here is the BEST Time to Plant Collard Greens in Georgia …

  • Author: thegardeningdad.com

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (36503 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 4 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 2 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Here is the BEST Time to Plant Collard Greens in Georgia … When Should You Start Your Collard Greens Seeds Indoors? … Depending on the type of collard greens, it takes roughly 30-40 days to grow collard …

  • Match the search results: Depending on the type of collard greens, it takes roughly 30-40 days to grow collard greens from seed indoors and then transplant them to your garden.

  • Quote from the source:

How to Grow Collards Plants in the Vegetable Garden.

  • Author: www.gardenersnet.com

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (18811 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about How to Grow Collards Plants in the Vegetable Garden. Indoors: Sow seeds for a spring crop indoors four to six weeks before planting outdoors. Plant your seedlings outdoors very early in the season. Collards can be …

  • Match the search results: Collard plants prefer full sunlight. Collards will grow in average and poorer soils. But like any plant, they respond favorably to richer soil high in nutrients.

  • Quote from the source:

Multi-read content what month do you plant collard greens

By: Joseph Masabni

how to grow collard greensGreen cabbage is one of the most nutritious vegetables. They are low in calories and high in protein, vitamins and minerals. Although they are part of the cabbage family, bumps do not form heads. They are grown for their leaves.

Collard greens are more tolerant of heat and cold than most other vegetables grown in Texas. They are easy to grow, very productive and well suited to large or small gardens. Cabbage grows best in cool weather and needs as much sun as possible.

working the land

Collard greens need deep, well-drained, well-prepared soil. The roots of the cabbage plant can easily reach a depth of more than 2 meters. Dig the soil as deep as possible or at least 10 inches. This will loosen the soil so that small roots can grow more easily.

Before planting, remove stones and large sticks from the ground; then spade to cover the crop on the soil surface. Allow time for the material to begin to rot.

If the soil is mostly clay or light sand, add organic matter. A 4-inch layer of compost should suffice. Spread compost over the planting area before digging.

Just before planting, spread a complete garden fertilizer like 10-10-10 over the area you are going to plant. Use 2 or 3 pounds for every 100 square feet, or about 1 cup for every 10 feet of row. Use a rake to mix the fertilizer 3 to 4 inches into the soil.

Slope the floor into grooves 6 to 8 inches high and at least 36 inches apart (Figure 1). This brings the fertilizer along the row, where the plants can easily reach it. The ridges also allow water to drain from the roots.

collard green ridges

Figure 1. Tear the floor in grooves 6 to 8 inches high and at least 36 inches apart.

Level

Green cabbage varieties suitable for growing in Texas include Blue Max, Champion, Flash, Georgia LS, Georgia Southern, Top Bunch, and Vates.

To plant a tree

Green cabbages can be started from transplants or from seed sown directly in the garden. Transplants are often used for spring crops. They can go an extra 4-5 weeks into the growing season because they can be grown indoors before the weather is warm enough to sow outdoors. Cabbage seeds germinate when the soil temperature reaches 45 degrees F.

Transfer the transplanted plant to the garden as soon as the ground can be plowed in the spring; in most of Texas, it’s February or March. Place the plant in the ground at a depth equal to that of the houseplant. Place them 18 to 24 inches apart (Figure 2). Water the plant after transplanting.

When sowing, make a shallow trench about ½ inch deep in the center of the bed. Scatter the seeds lightly in the groove. With a little practice, you can easily disperse seeds by tapping the edge of an open seed packet with your finger. One teaspoon of seeds will plant about 30 feet of rows.

Cover the seeds with about ¼ inch of loose soil or compost; then sprinkle them with water. The plant will flower in 6-12 days. However, the colder the soil, the slower the seeds germinate.

For fall crops, sow seeds in the garden about 80 days before frost, which is August or September in most parts of Texas. Sow the seeds a lot and then thinly.

collard greens plant spacing

Figure 2. Space collision trees about 18 inches apart.

Care in season

Once the plants have sprouted, let them grow until they reach about 4 to 6 inches tall or in rows. Then gradually thin the plants until there are about 18 inches between them. Overcrowding makes the leaves small and less green.

Young plants can be transplanted to another site or used as a green plant (Figure 3).

collard green thinned plants

Figure 3. Thinned trees can be transplanted to another site or used as a foliage plant.

Fertilization

Spread 1 cup of garden fertilizer next to the plants for every 30 feet of row, about 1 tablespoon per plant. This is called party dressing. Lightly mix the compost with the soil and water.

Plants may need to be shaded again after 4-6 weeks if they turn pale and there is no sign that insects have caused this change.

When the plants thin out to the final distance or if they turn light green, apply a little more fertilizer. Green cabbages need a lot of nitrogen to develop a dark green leaf color.

Sprinklers

Water the plant thoroughly every week if it does not rain.

Grass

Keep the garden free of weeds as they deprive the plants of water and nutrients. Weed or hoe the lawn carefully to avoid injuring the roots of the lawn mower.

Insect

Many insecticides are available at garden centers for homeowners to use. Sevin® is a synthetic insecticide; Biological options include Bt and sulfur based insecticides. Sulfur also has fungicidal properties and helps control many diseases.

Before using any pesticide, read the label and always follow the precautions, warnings and directions.

collard green bugs

Diseases

Collisions are prone to a number of diseases. If the plant has leaf spots, you may need to use a fungicide. Inspect plants daily and treat with an approved fungicide if disease is present. Neem oil, sulfur and other fungicides are available. Always follow label instructions.

Harvest

Collard greens can be harvested in two ways. For smaller plants that need thinning, cut the entire plant about 4 inches above the ground (Figure 4). Sometimes they will grow back to one side of the stem. Usually only the lower leaves of the primrose are harvested. This allows the plant to continue growing and producing more leaves. In temperate regions, such as southern Texas and coastal areas, collisions will occur throughout the winter.

In some cases, the impact can withstand temperatures of 20 degrees F or less. They taste sweeter after a light frost.

harvesting collard greens

Figure 4. To harvest primrose, cut small plants above the ground or remove lower leaves as the plant grows.

To serve

To avoid losing nutrients, do not overcook macadamia nuts in water. Your county extension agent can provide more information on cooking and serving cabbage.

Download a printable version of this page: How to grow green cabbage

See this publication in Spanish:Como cultivar col verde

Do you have questions – or do you need to contact an expert?

Contact your county office

Popular questions about what month do you plant collard greens

what month do you plant collard greens?

Plant collard greens in spring 3 to 4 weeks before the last frost. These plants will grow well in raised beds, containers, and in-ground gardens. Space plants 18 to 24 inches apart in an area with full sun and fertile, well-drained soil with a pH of 6.5 to 6.8.

What month do you plant collards?

The collard is a cool-season crop that should be grown during early spring or fall. Direct seed midsummer or early spring. Set transplants out in early spring or late summer. The mature plant will withstand frosts and light to medium freezes.

How long does it take to grow collard greens?

about 80 days
Collards need about 80 days to mature from seed to harvest, but this can vary by variety, so check the back of your seed packet or plant pick. Depending on where you live, you might be able to do a spring planting of collards, though these greens won’t have the benefit of a sweetening frost.

What season does collard greens grow in?

spring
Collards can be planted in early spring for early summer harvest, or in late/summer or early fall for a late fall harvest. Most varieties are ready to harvest in 55 to 75 days.27 thg 10, 2020

How late can you plant collards?

When to Plant Collard Greens

Collard greens are a cool season vegetable and are often planted in late summer to early autumn for winter harvest in the south. In more northern areas, collards may be planted a little earlier for fall or winter harvest.

When should I plant cabbage?

Place cabbage transplants in the garden when they are 3 to 4 inches (7-10cm) tall as early as 3 to 4 weeks before the last frost in spring. Direct sow seed outdoors when the soil can be worked in spring. In mild-winter regions, start seed in late summer for a winter or spring harvest.

Do collard greens come back every year?

Do collard greens come back every year? Collard greens are biennials and known as a “cut and come again vegetable.” In other words, these are just veggies that are harvested in a different way than most people are used to. The leaves grow in a “rosette” which means they circulate from the inside out.

Are collards easy to grow?

Collards tolerate more heat and cold than most other vegetables grown in Texas. They are easy to grow, productive, and well suited to either large or small gardens. Collards grow best in cool weather and need as much sunlight as possible.

Are coffee grounds good for collard greens?

All that’s required to grow collard greens is a location that gets full sun and well-draining soil rich in organic matter. Collard plants prefer somewhat acidic soil with a pH between 6.0 and 6.8. Applying used coffee grounds as mulch around your plants helps add nitrogen to the soil and slightly lower the pH.

Will collards grow in the winter?

Collards are a biennial that typically overwinter in USDA Hardiness Zones 8-10, though in a mild year they may even survive in colder zones unassisted. I once grew collard greens in my Zone 6 garden that survived through the winter without protection and resumed growth the next year!

Will collard greens grow in summer?

It’s a wonder they’re so popular because they tend to attract a lot of pests. But the secret to growing these large green leaves is to grow them at the right time. Although collards will flourish in summer, they’re less likely to attract pests in winter. And as the weather cools, the flavor of collards sweetens.

Can you plant collard greens in November?

You can plant them in spring and fall, although collards planted in fall gardens are favored because the leaves are sweeter when kissed by frost.

What temperature do collards grow?

between 45 to 85 degrees Fahrenheit
When to Plant Collard Greens

Collard greens can handle quite a range of soil temperatures, including light frost, and will do fine in soil between 45 to 85 degrees Fahrenheit throughout the growing season.

How do I keep bugs from eating my collard greens?

Spicy foods such as onion, garlic and hot pepper are fatally irritating to pests on collards. Make a garlic or hot pepper spray by steeping a few cloves of garlic or a teaspoon of cayenne pepper in a quart of water for about an hour. You can also add a chopped, raw onion to the water.

How do I keep bugs off my collard greens?

Combine five parts water, two parts isopropyl alcohol and 1 teaspoon of dish liquid in a spray bottle. Spray the collard greens thoroughly, contacting all parts of the leaves once a week, to control flea beetles.

Video tutorials about what month do you plant collard greens

keywords: #growingcollardgreens, #growingcollards, #growinggeorgiacollards, #harvestingcollardgreensinsummer, #collardgreenharvest, #georgiacollards, #bbettagarden, #howtoharvestcollardgreenssoitkeepsgrowing, #harvestingcollards, #collards, #collardgreens(food), #pickingcollards, #collardgreens, #bbetta, #pickinggreens, #harvestinggreens, #greens, #organicgardening, #howto, #pestcontrol, #cabbagemothorganiccontrol, #garden, #gardening

Zone 6 (Chicago, IL, USA)

Hey there! In this video I talk about how I grow collard greens in my garden. There are 5 things that I have consistently done over the last few years when growing collard greens (in zone 6) that I believe have led to healthy and huge collard green harvests!

Thanks for watching!

………………….

Huge Collard Green Harvest:

-https://youtu.be/TRtLRZqwvIk

………………….

SUBSCRIBE | CLICK the Notification Bell for Updates | LIKE | COMMENT | SHARE

………………….

B Betta Garden’s Social Media Info

➡️ YouTube:

-https://www.youtube.com/c/BBettaGarden

➡️ Instagram:

-https://www.instagram.com/b_bettagarden

➡️ Facebook:

-https://www.facebook.com/B-Betta-Garden-104766890935855/

➡️ Wishlist:

-https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/3FRKVWT40FO9W?ref_=wl_share

➡️ Backyard Gardens Podcast:

Any place you listen to podcasts including:

SPOTIFY:

-https://open.spotify.com/show/0mhebHqc22jfPsO21BymjO?si=Yg94DQ9lSEG7AeX9JwL90A

APPLE:

-https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-backyard-gardens-podcast/id1478272793

PODBEAN:

-https://www.podbean.com/ei/pb-zvj33-d6776f

keywords: #outdoors, #collards, #youtube, #gardening, #VirginiaFarmBureau

Chris Mullis show us how to grow collards fresh from the ground up in Virginia. More at http;//VaFarmBureau.org.

keywords: #CollardGreens(Food), #collards, #LeafVegetable(Food), #OrganicFood(Industry), #organicgardening, #urbangardening, #urbanfarming, #Food(TVGenre)

How to grow, harvest and cook collard greens.

keywords: #howtogrowcollardgreenathome, #collardgreen, #progressiongrowingguide, #growingguide, #plantcollardgreen, #hollisnancyshomestead, #how, #howtogrowcollardgreeninthegardenbed, #howtogrowcollardgreeninthegarden, #howtogrowcollardgreenfromseed, #howtogrowcollardgreenfromseedtoharvest, #howtogrowcollardgreen, #favoritecollardgreen, #fallgarden, #fallharvest, #greens, #growyourownfood, #seedtoharvest, #athome, #collardgreens, #collards, #gardening, #topbunch

Once cooked the flavour is rich and savory, in this video we will cover

how to grow our FAVORITE collard greens from SEED to HARVEST at home.

This video go thru (SEED to HARVEST) Step by Step with UPDATES =

Progression Growing Guide to help you easily grow this delicious collard green at home.

#fallgarden #gardening #growyourownfood

Top Bunch is a New! Georgia-type hybrid. Earliest to harvest. Tall, productive plant produces medium green, slightly savoyed leaves. Most attractive variety for fresh market sales.

👍If you like our videos, give us a THUMBS UP, POSITIVE COMMENT and SHARE!

It encourages us to keep producing excellent videos

 

🔗Link below for products used in the video:

 

👆Subscribe now to never miss a new videos. 

You Tube:  

-https://www.youtube.com/c/HollisNancysHomestead

 

FOLLOW US HERE:

✅Facebook: 

-https://www.facebook.com/HollisandNancysHomestead/

✅Instagram: 

-https://www.instagram.com/hollisnancyshomestead/

✅Pinterest: 

-https://www.pinterest.com/HollisNancy/

✅Twitter: 

-https://twitter.com/HNHomestead

 

💝HOW TO PARTNER WITH: Thank you!

🌼Help with the Comments – Questions from New gardeners 💝

 🙏🏼Please  Pray 🙏🏼 for the mission – ” To inspire healthier families”

💝POSITIVE COMMENTS, SHARE and LIKE👍 

💝Use our Amazon links (FREE to you)

US –

-https://www.amazon.com/shop/hollisnancyshomestead

Canada –

-https://www.amazon.ca/shop/hollisnancyshomestead

United Kingdom –

-https://www.amazon.co.uk/shop/hollisnancyshomestead

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn small fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.

💝Partner with us by donation: can use Debit or Credit Card thru PayPal

-https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick\u0026hosted_button_id=X3YQ9ZDA3N5Z8\u0026source=url

💝Thank you for partnering with us! Your partnership helps us to continue to provide great content on YouTube. We are grateful!

Hollis, Nancy, and Bing Bing

Have a Blessed Day

🌼🌼🌼

FTC Disclaimer: This is not a sponsored video, unless clearly disclosed. All opinions are genuinely our own. We provide our videos for inspirational and entertainment purposes only. It is your responsibility to evaluate the accuracy, timeliness, completeness, or usefulness of the content, instructions and advice contained in our videos. Hollis and Nancy’s Homestead, LLC, is not liable for any loss or damage caused by your reliance on anything contained in our video

See more articles in category: FAQs